Posts tagged with #work

It’s official: 14 years of staring at a screen and scribbling in a notebook for a living. Starting a business is like taking flight without knowing if you’ll stay in the air. I can’t explain it, but I haven’t touched the ground yet. Thanks for your patience and support. The 17-year-old kid who skipped school to freelance could never have imagined any of this.

Now-a-days you hear people not going to college and starting businesses and it’s just kind of this sexy, understood concept. Be smart, work 24/7 on your start-up. It wasn’t like that when I was getting started; college was something that was pushed onto many kids in my particular generation. I didn’t have the money for college and it seemed better to take a year off and figure some things out. It was a big decision to not attend college, it was a decision out of necessity.

— Chuck Anderson in an interview with Chicago Creatives

Yes. I shared this exact experience and feeling.

“It looks like you’re a gangster trying to hack into something.” —Daisy’s 11-year-old sister seeing me work

Previously: Biography

When I was 17, I became a freelance designer & developer. Brief summary of every single day:

Credibility lasts about two cycles of bad material, and then you’ll probably never get it back. If you let people down, that’s really hard to come back from— harder than climbing from nothing to something, even.

— Louis C.K. in an interview with Pitchfork


via Austin Kleon

You get no competitive edge from consuming the same stuff everyone else is consuming.

— Derek Sivers on disconnecting and focusing

Previously: Important (2014)

I would never have a five-year plan. If I’d stuck to my original five-year plan when I was 18, I would have missed every great thing that ever happened to me.

— Marissa Mayer in an interview with Bloomberg Businessweek

Things don’t just flow out of your brain. It’s not like, Hey, I’m brilliant. Show up, paper right here, bam, another banger. No—you sit and you struggle with yourself and you stop cutting your hair. I’m not cutting my hair right now. You stop shaving, like I’m not shaving right now. You remember that you can fail. I’ve failed several times. The fact that everybody else don’t see that don’t give me the right to not see it.

— Ta-Nehisi Coates in an interview with Playboy

Alexa writing in Havana, Cuba

Journalists at work look abooout 1,000 times cooler than when I’m at work. It’s not fair.

[Your film budget estimate and the studio’s estimate] are going to be far apart, and there is a negotiation to find your way in the middle, unless you’re David Fincher, OK, who comes in and says $41 million. And the studio will say $30 million, and he’ll say, no, $41 million, and the studio is, like, $35 million. And he said listen, you think I’m negotiating with you. I’m telling you, the price of this movie is $41 million. That’s what it costs to make this movie. I don’t want to make the $40.5 million version of the movie.

— Aaron Sorkin on working with David Fincher in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter

Previously: David Fincher on compromise

If it hasn’t [already] been done, and if it’s of value, there’s really good reasons it’s not being done. And so when you’re confronted with those reasons, you’ve got two choices: You can say, “Oh, that’s a very good reason. I’m sorry for bothering you.” Or you can say, “I don’t believe that. I’m going to find out more.”

— Jonathan Ive in an interview with Charlie Rose

Heading back after a short business trip to San Jose, California

Working at ANML’s office in Los Gatos, California

Once again, Daisy’s little sister eloquently illustrates my life with pinpoint accuracy.

Previously: Always be cookie-ing