You know the cliché: You’re out on the town, you’re doing drugs, you’re drinking, you’re running on the walls, you’re pissing on the fireplace. It’s a cliché. Often you run into artists who live that life—and at one point, you find out that they’re not actually producing that much art. They’re living the life of the artist without the work.

— Dorthe Nors in What Great Artists Need: Solitude

At the beach in Yilan County, Taiwan

Trees pulled from the ground and thrown in the street during a typhoon in Taiwan

Saturday night in Da’an District, Taipei, Taiwan

Mingde train station entrance in Taipei, Taiwan

  • Isaac: Someone holds the copyright to ‘Happy Birthday’?
  • Dan: They’re representatives of Patty and Mildred Hill.
  • Isaac: Took two people to write that song?

— From an episode of Sports Night

I have the same reaction whenever a musician is exposed for using ghostwriters.

Another office cat in Taipei, Taiwan

Previously: Official office cat

It took seven years from the time I wrote Mad Men until it finally got on the screen. I lived every day with that script as if it were going to happen tomorrow. That’s the faith you have to have.

— Matthew Weiner in an excerpt from Getting There: A Book of Mentors by Gillian Zoe Segal

Previously:
“When I wrote the pilot of Mad Men, I was saying, I’m already successful, why am I not happy?”

Traffic in Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan

Midnight ramen at Afuri in Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan

Keelung night market in Taiwan

Previously: Watercolors #2 (2013)

Street vendor at Shilin District night market in Taipei, Taiwan

We must believe in luck. For how else can we explain the success of those we don’t like?

— Jean Cocteau